Age- and sex-differences in vascular responsiveness in healthy and trauma patients: contribution of estrogen receptor-mediated Rho kinase and PKC pathways.

American journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology

PubMedID: 24531808

Li T, Xiao X, Zhang J, Zhu Y, Hu Y, Zang J, Lu K, Yang T, Ge H, Peng X, Lan D, Liu L. Age- and sex-differences in vascular responsiveness in healthy and trauma patients: contribution of estrogen receptor-mediated Rho kinase and PKC pathways. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2014;.
Background Several medical conditions exhibit age- and sex-based differences. Whether or not traumatic shock exhibits such differences with regard to vascular responsiveness is not clear. Methods In a cohort of 177 healthy subjects, 842 trauma patients (21-82 years) as well as different ages (4, 8, 10, 14, 18 and 24 weeks; 1 and 1.5 years) and sexes of Sprague-Dawley normal and traumatic shock rats, the age- and sex-based differences of vascular responsiveness and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Results Middle-aged and young women as well as female rats of reproductive age had higher vascular responsiveness in the normal condition and a lower decrease in vascular responsiveness after traumatic shock than older men and male rats of identical age. Exogenous supplementation of 17ß-estrdiol increased vascular reactivity in both male and femal rats of 8-24 weeks and preserved vascular responsiveness in rats following traumatic shock. No effect was observed in rats 1-1.5y.. These protective effects of estrogen were closely related to GPR 30, estrogen receptor-mediated Rho kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) pathway activation. Conclusion Vascular responsiveness exhibits age- and sex-based differences in healthy subjects and trauma patients. Estrogen and its receptor (GPR 30) mediated activation of Rho kinase and PKC using genomic and non-genomic mechanisms to elicit protective effects in vascular responsiveness. This finding is important for the personalized treatment for several age- and sex-related diseases involving estrogen.