Statistical Modeling of Behavioral Dynamics DuringPropofol-Induced Loss of Consciousness.

Journal of neuroscience methods

PubMedID: 24530701

Wong KF, Smith AC, Pierce ET, Harrell PG, Walsh JL, Salazar-Gómez AF, Tavares CL, Purdon PL, Brown EN. Statistical Modeling of Behavioral Dynamics DuringPropofol-Induced Loss of Consciousness. J Neurosci Methods. 2014;.
(Background) Accurate quantitative analysis of the changes in responses to external stimuli is crucial for characterizing the timing of loss and recovery of consciousness induced by anesthetic drugs. We studied induction and emergence from unconsciousness achieved by administering a computer-controlled infusion of propofol to ten human volunteers. We evaluated loss and recovery of consciousness by having subjects execute every four seconds two interleaved computer delivered behavioral tasks: responding to verbal stimuli (neutral words or the subject's name), or less salient stimuli of auditory clicks. (New Method) We analyzed the data using state-space methods. For each stimulus type the observation model is a two-stage binomial model and the state model is two dimensional random walk in which one cognitive state governs the probability of responding and the second governs the probability of correctly responding given a response. We fit the model to the experimental data using Bayesian Monte Carlo methods. (Results) During induction subjects lost responsiveness to less salient clicks before losing responsiveness to the more salient verbal stimuli. During emergence subjects regained responsiveness to the more salient verbal stimuli before regaining responsiveness to the less salient clicks. (Comparison with Existing Method(s)) The current state-space model is an extension of previous model used to analyze learning and behavioral performance. In this study, the probability of responding on each trial is obtained separately from the probability of behavioral performance. (Conclusions) Our analysis provides a principled quantitative approach for defining loss and recovery of consciousness in experimental studies of general anesthesia.