Auditory magnetic response to clicks in children and adults: its components, hemispheric lateralization and repetition suppression effect.

Brain topography

PubMedID: 23104186

Orekhova EV, Butorina AV, Tsetlin MM, Novikova SI, Sokolov PA, Elam M, Stroganova TA. Auditory magnetic response to clicks in children and adults: its components, hemispheric lateralization and repetition suppression effect. Brain Topogr. 2013;26(3):410-27.
The auditory magnetic event-related fields (ERF) qualitatively change through the child development, reflecting maturation of auditory cortical areas. Clicks presented with long inter-stimulus interval produce distinct ERF components, and may appear useful to characterize immature EFR morphology in children. The present study is aimed to investigate morphology of the auditory ERFs in school-age children, as well as lateralization and repetition suppression of ERF components evoked by the clicks. School-age children and adults passively listened to pairs of click presented to the right ear, left ear or binaurally, with 8-11 s intervals between the pairs and a 1 s interval within a pair. Adults demonstrated a typical P50m/N100m response. Unlike adults, children had two distinct components preceding the N100m-P50m (at ~65 ms) and P100m (at ~100 ms). The P100m dominated the child ERF, and was most prominent in response to binaural stimulation. The N100m in children was less developed than in adults and partly overlapped in time with the P100m, especially in response to monaural clicks. Strong repetition suppression was observed for P50m both in children and adults, P100m in children and N100m in adults. Both children and adults demonstrated ERF amplitude and/or latency right hemispheric advantage effects that may reflect right hemisphere dominance for preattentive arousal processes. Our results contribute to the knowledge concerning development of auditory processing and its lateralization in children and have implications for investigation of the auditory evoked fields in developmental disorders.