Vitamin D metabolism and action in human marrow stromal cells: effects of chronic kidney disease.

The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology

PubMedID: 22989482

Zhou S, Leboff MS, Waikar SS, Glowacki J. Vitamin D metabolism and action in human marrow stromal cells: effects of chronic kidney disease. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2013;136342-4.
Human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) are targets of 1a,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1a,25(OH)2D3] action to promote their differentiation to osteoblasts, but they also participate in vitamin D metabolism by converting 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] to 1a,25(OH)2D3 by 1a-hydroxylase (CYP27B1). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with impaired renal biosynthesis of 1a,25(OH)2D, low bone mass, and increased fracture risk. We tested whether CKD influences hMSCs' responses to vitamin D3 metabolites. The hMSCs were obtained from tissues discarded during arthroplasty for hip osteoarthrosis, including a subject who had been undergoing hemodialysis for 2+ years. There was a significant positive correlation between in vitro stimulation of osteoblastogenesis (alkaline phosphatase activity) by 1a,25(OH)2D3 and subjects' estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, r=0.47, p=0.015, n=26, 56-83 years of age). Osteoblastogenesis was stimulated in hMSCs from both the hemodialysis and control subjects by 1a,25(OH)2D3 (10µM), 25(OH)D3 (100µM), or D3 (1000µM). Thus, vitamin D metabolism may play an autocrine/paracrine role in osteoblast differentiation of hMSCs. These findings suggest that in CKD patients 25(OH)D-sufficiency may play an important role in skeletal health; osteoblastic bone formation in CKD patients may not be optimal unless there is sufficient serum 25(OH)D substrate for the MSCs to synthesize and respond to local 1a,25(OH)2D. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'.