Passive measles immunity in a nigerian tertiary health care facility: the influence of human immunodeficiency virus infection on measles antibody levels in mother-infant pairs at birth.

West African journal of medicine

PubMedID: 23468026

Baba UA, Mustapha MG, Ashir GM, Rabasa AI, Ibrahim BA, Ibrahim HA. Passive measles immunity in a nigerian tertiary health care facility: the influence of human immunodeficiency virus infection on measles antibody levels in mother-infant pairs at birth. West Afr J Med. 2013;31(4):243-6.
Background: Infants are protected from measles infection by maternal measles antibodies (MMA). The level of these MMA at birth in newborn children depends on the levels in their mother and the extent of placental transfer. We investigated maternal HIV infection as a predictor of levels of MMA in mother-infant pairs in Maiduguri. Methods: A total of 180 mother-infant pairs were tested for MMA between 15th January and 29th March 2010. Levels of MMA were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. Results: Fifteen (8.3%) mothers were found with HIV infection and all were on antiretroviral treatment for HIV, and all of them had protective MMA. Of these mothers with HIV infection, only one (0.6%) of their newborn infants had unprotective level of maternal measles antibody. Maternal measles antibodies in mother-infant pairs had significant correlation (p = 0.005) for both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected groups. The mean MMA of the newborn children was lower in infants of HIV-infected mothers than in HIV-uninfected mothers (p = 0.37). Linear regression analysis showed no significant association between maternal HIV infection and MMA in mother-infant pairs (p = 0.72) for mothers and (p = 0.37) for newborn infants. Conclusion: Maternal HIV infection was not associated with significantly reduced MMA in mother-infant pairs, as high protective levels were evident in both mother-infant pairs at birth.