The involvement of the fibronectin type II-like modules of human gelatinase A in cell surface localization and activation.

The Journal of biological chemistry

PubMedID: 9685420

Steffensen B, Bigg HF, Overall CM. The involvement of the fibronectin type II-like modules of human gelatinase A in cell surface localization and activation. J Biol Chem. 1998;273(32):20622-8.
Recombinant collagen-binding domain (rCBD) comprising the three fibronectin type II-like modules of human gelatinase A was found to compete the zymogen form of this matrix metalloproteinase from the cell surface of normal human fibroblasts in culture. Upon concanavalin A treatment of cells, the induced cellular activation of gelatinase A was markedly elevated in the presence of the rCBD. Therefore, the mechanistic aspects of gelatinase A binding to cells by this domain were further studied using cell attachment assays. Fibroblasts attached to rCBD-coated microplate wells in a manner that was inhibited by soluble rCBD, blocking antibodies to the beta1-integrin subunit but not the alpha2-integrin subunit, and bacterial collagenase treatment. Addition of soluble collagen rescued the attachment of collagenase-treated cells to the rCBD. As a probe on ligand blots of octyl-beta-D-thioglucopyranoside-solubilized cell membrane extracts, the rCBD bound 140- and 160-kDa protein bands. Their identities were likely procollagen chains being both bacterial collagenase-sensitive and also converted upon pepsin digestion to 112- and 126-kDa bands that co-migrated with collagen alpha1(I) and alpha2(I) chains. A rCBD mutant protein (Lys263 --> Ala) with reduced collagen affinity showed less cell attachment, whereas a heparin-binding deficient mutant (Lys357 --> Ala), heparinase treatment, or heparin addition did not alter attachment. Thus, a cell-binding mechanism for gelatinase A is revealed that does not involve the hemopexin COOH domain. Instead, an attachment complex comprising gelatinase A-native type I collagen-beta1-integrin forms as a result of interactions involving the collagen-binding domain of the enzyme. Moreover, this distinct pool of cell collagen-bound proenzyme appears recalcitrant to cellular activation.