Black blood magnetic resonance angiography with Dy-DTPA polymer: effect on arterial intraluminal signal intensity, lumen diameter, and wall thickness.

Journal of magnetic resonance imaging : JMRI

PubMedID: 9786141

Eubank WB, Schmiedl UP, Yuan C, Black CD, Kellar KE, Ladd DL, Nelson JA. Black blood magnetic resonance angiography with Dy-DTPA polymer: effect on arterial intraluminal signal intensity, lumen diameter, and wall thickness. J Magn Reson Imaging. 1998;8(5):1051-9.
Four rabbits in which atherosclerotic disease was induced by diet and balloon angioplasty underwent conventional angiography and MR angiography (MRA) using a black blood pulse sequence before and 10 minutes after the i.v. injection of a macromolecular contrast agent, NC 100283 (1.0 mmol/kg), a dysprosium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid hexamethylenediamine copolymer (Dy-DTPA polymer). Intraluminal signal intensity, apparent wall thickness, and lumen size measurements of the aorta and proximal common iliac arteries on precontrast MRA images were compared with postcontrast images. Aortic lumen diameter measurements on the precontrast and postcontrast MRA studies were compared with lumen diameters from conventional angiograms. Intraluminal signal intensity decreased on postcontrast MRA images compared with precontrast images, with an average loss of signal equal to 29% (P < .05). Apparent wall thickness decreased by 24% (P < .05). Lumen diameter and area were generally larger (average of 15% and 33%, respectively) on postcontrast MRA images than on precontrast images. Aortic lumen diameter measurements from postcontrast MRA agreed closely (95% confidence interval of the mean difference was -.2 to .3 mm), and precontrast MRA images tended to underestimate aortic lumen diameter (95% confidence interval of the mean difference was .3 to .8 mm) compared with conventional angiography. Postcontrast MRA with NC 100283, a macromolecular Dy-DTPA contrast agent, provides more accurate assessment of aortic lumen diameter than precontrast MRA, using conventional angiography as the standard reference.