Occupational factors, smoking habits and tobacco withdrawal symptoms among male Japanese employees.

Industrial health

PubMedID: 9009496

Kawakami N, Takatsuka N, Shimizu H. Occupational factors, smoking habits and tobacco withdrawal symptoms among male Japanese employees. Ind Health. 1997;35(1):9-15.
The aim of the study is to know the effects of occupational factors and smoking habits on tobacco withdrawal symptoms among male Japanese employees. A total of 2,862 male employees in a company in Japan completed questionnaires concerning tobacco withdrawal symptoms, occupational factors (occupation, shift work, work stress) and smoking habits. Data from 1,443 male ever-quitters were analyzed. Among male ever-quitters, 67% had ever experienced tobacco withdrawal symptoms. Significantly higher age-adjusted rates of tobacco withdrawal symptoms were found in those who experienced frequent exhaustion after work, current smokers, those who smoked 20 or more cigarettes per day, smoked for 20 years or longer and tried to quit smoking twice or more (p < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that younger age, technical/clerical occupation, exhaustion after work, number of cigarettes smoked per day, duration of smoking, currently smoking and number of trials to quit smoking, were significantly associated with tobacco withdrawal symptoms (p < 0.05). It is suggested that younger age, technical/clerical occupation, exhaustion after work, number of cigarettes smoked and duration of smoking are risk factors of tobacco withdrawal symptoms in male Japanese employees.