Microgeographic structure of Anopheles gambiae in western Kenya based on mtDNA and microsatellite loci.

Molecular ecology

PubMedID: 9076979

Lehmann T, Besansky NJ, Hawley WA, Fahey TG, Kamau L, Collins FH. Microgeographic structure of Anopheles gambiae in western Kenya based on mtDNA and microsatellite loci. Mol Ecol. 1997;6(3):243-53.
The population genetic structure of the Anopheles gambiae in western Kenya was studied using length variation at five microsatellite loci and sequence variation in a 648-nt mtDNA fragment. Mosquitoes were collected from houses in villages spanning up to 50 km distance. The following questions were answered. (i) Are mosquitoes in a house more related genetically to each other than mosquitoes between houses? (ii) What degree of genetic differentiation occurs on these geographical scales? (iii) How consistent are the results obtained with both types of genetic markers? At the house level, no differentiation was detected by FST and RST, and the band sharing index test revealed no significant associations of alleles across loci. Likewise, indices of kinship based on mtDNA haplotypes in houses were even lower than in the pooled sample. Therefore, the hypothesis that mosquitoes in a house are more related genetically was rejected. At increasing geographical scales, microsatellite allele distributions were similar among all population samples and no subdivision of the gene pool was detected by FST or RST. Likewise, estimates of haplotype divergence of mtDNA between populations were not higher than the within population estimates, and mtDNA-based FST values were not significantly different from zero. That sequence variation in mtDNA provided matching results with microsatellite loci (while high genetic variation was observed in all loci), suggested that this pattern represents the whole genome. The minimum area associated with a deme of A. gambiae in western Kenya is therefore larger than 50 km in diameter.