Increased platinum-DNA damage tolerance is associated with cisplatin resistance and cross-resistance to various chemotherapeutic agents in unrelated human ovarian cancer cell lines.

Cancer Research

PubMedID: 9041185

Johnson SW, Laub PB, Beesley JS, Ozols RF, Hamilton TC. Increased platinum-DNA damage tolerance is associated with cisplatin resistance and cross-resistance to various chemotherapeutic agents in unrelated human ovarian cancer cell lines. Cancer Res. 1997;57(5):850-6.
We have examined a panel of 12 unrelated human ovarian cancer cell lines derived from patients who were either untreated or treated with platinum-based chemotherapy to determine whether a relationship is present between cisplatin sensitivity and: (a) cellular platinum accumulation; (b) glutathione levels; (c) platinum-DNA adduct formation; (d) platinum-DNA adduct removal; and (e) platinum-DNA damage tolerance. Multiple regression and correlation analysis revealed that of these resistance mechanisms, platinum-DNA damage tolerance correlates strongly with cisplatin sensitivity (r = 0.84, P = 0.001), whereas platinum accumulation (r = -0.11), cellular glutathione levels (r = 0.13), and platinum-DNA adduct removal (r = 0.44) correlate insignificantly. The correlation of platinum-DNA damage tolerance to cisplatin sensitivity (IC50s) is derived from the clustering of platinum-DNA adduct formation into three distinct groups spanning a 3-fold range, which is narrow relative to the corresponding 43-fold range in sensitivity. Adduct formation itself is not associated with cisplatin sensitivity (r = -0.38). Strong correlations were also observed between platinum-DNA damage tolerance and sensitivity to Adriamycin (r = 0.80, P = 0.002), paclitaxel (r = 0.87, P = 0.0002), etoposide (r = 0.78, P = 0.003), and mitomycin C (r = 0.73, P = 0.007). These results suggest that the failure of pathways that are involved in recognizing and processing platinum-DNA damage and other types of drug-induced damage that culminate in cell death may result in a broad resistance phenotype.