Recall of HbA1c and self-management behaviours, patient activation, perception of care and diabetes distress in Type 2 diabetes.

Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association

PubMedID: 23331258

Willaing I, Rogvi SA, Bøgelund M, Almdal T, Schiøtz M. Recall of HbA1c and self-management behaviours, patient activation, perception of care and diabetes distress in Type 2 diabetes. Diabet Med. 2013;30(4):e139-42.
AIMS
The aim of this study was to investigate associations between HbA1c recall by patients with Type 2 diabetes and self-management behaviours, patient activation, perception of care and diabetes distress.

METHODS
In a cross-sectional survey, 993 patients with Type 2 diabetes reported their latest HbA(1c). Validated scales measured self-management behaviours, patient activation, perception of care and diabetes distress. Self-reported HbA(1c) was compared with latest measured HbA(1c). Using logistic regressions, associations between HbA(1c) recall and the variables of interest were investigated.

RESULTS
Sixty-four per cent of patients recalled their latest HbA(1c). Poor HbA(1c) recall was significantly associated with unhealthy eating behaviour, low level of exercise, low level of patient activation, poor glycaemic control, not knowing target HbA(1c) level, low educational level and being female. There were no associations between recall of HbA(1c) and diabetes distress or perceived care.

CONCLUSIONS
Recall of HbA(1c) level may increase patient activation and health-promoting behaviours. However, low educational level may be a barrier for using HbA(1c) as a motivator for health-promoting behaviours. This study indicates a need for studies of causal relationships, as well as mechanisms and challenges in using patient awareness of HbA(1c) as a driver for health-promoting behaviours.