Cigarette smoking is associated with the reduction of lymphokine-activated killer cell and natural killer cell activities.

Environmental health and preventive medicine

PubMedID: 21432415

Inoue C, Takeshita T, Kondo H, Morimoto K. Cigarette smoking is associated with the reduction of lymphokine-activated killer cell and natural killer cell activities. Environ Health Prev Med. 1996;1(1):14-9.
Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell and natural killer (NK) cell activities were determined in a group of healthy individuals with differing smoking habits. The study population consisted of 54 Japanese males, including 23 smokers, 8 ex-smokers and 23 non-smokers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and used as effector cells. LAK cells were generated by incubation of PBMC with interleukin-2 for 72 h. LAK cell activity against NK-resistant Raji cells and NK cell activity against NK-sensitive K562 cells were examined by 4-h51Cr-release assay. LAK cell activity in the smokers was significantly lower than that in the nonsmokers. The smokers showed significantly lower NK cell activity than the nonsmokers, whereas NK cell activity of the ex-smokers was comparable to that of the non-smokers. The proportion of NK cells (CD3-16+56-, CD3-16-56+, or CD3-16+56+ cells) in the smokers was significantly lower than that in the nonsmokers. The present study demonstrates for the first time that cigarette smokers have lower LAK cell activity than nonsmokers.