Comparison of immigrant and native-born population adherence to antipsychotic treatment in a Spanish health region.

Community mental health journal

PubMedID: 23054154

Forcada I, Pera V, Cruz I, Pifarre J, Josep P, Serna C, Rué M, Galván L. Comparison of immigrant and native-born population adherence to antipsychotic treatment in a Spanish health region. Community Ment Health J. 2013;49(2):199-205.
Previous studies report that immigrants underuse psychiatric hospitalization services and are less exposed to antipsychotic medication. The objective of this study is to determine whether immigrant and Spanish native groups with psychotic disorder adhere differently to antipsychotic drugs. Retrospective study including two matched samples of 47 immigrants and 47 native-born patients with psychotic disorder admitted to a psychiatric Unit (2006-2007). Adherence was measured after one-year follow-up. Only 30 % of patients adhered to treatment (40.4 % of native-born, and 19.1 % of immigrants). The lowest rate of adherence was found in sub-Saharans. Fifty per cent of non-adherents were readmitted after 12 months, compared with 21.4 % of adherents, the effect was observed in both native and immigrants. This alarmingly poor adherence in immigrant patients with psychosis underlines the need for preventive strategies to minimize the negative clinical, social and economic outcomes.