Predictors of low back pain in a longitudinal study of Iranian nurses and office workers.

Work (Reading, Mass.)

PubMedID: 24763343

Sadeghian F, Coggon D, Ntani G, Hosseinzadeh S. Predictors of low back pain in a longitudinal study of Iranian nurses and office workers. Work. 2014;.
BACKGROUND
A previous survey had indicated high rates of low back pain (LBP) in Iranian nurses and office workers.

OBJECTIVE
To explore possible risk factors, we carried out a longitudinal study of the same subjects.

METHODS
Baseline information about risk factors and recent history of LBP was collected by self-administered questionnaire from 246 nurses and 182 office workers. Approximately 12 months later, 385 (90%) answered a second questionnaire about LBP in the past month. Predictors of LBP at follow-up were assessed by Poisson regression and summarised by prevalence rate ratios (PRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS
In a regression model that included all risk factors, the strongest predictor of LBP at follow-up was report of recent LBP at baseline. In addition, LBP was associated with older age, adverse beliefs about the work-relatedness of LBP (PRR 1.3, 95%CI 1.0-1.5), and incentives from piecework or bonuses (PRR 1.4, 95%CI 1.1-1.6). When baseline report of LBP was omitted from the model, associations were also observed with tendency to somatise, poor mental health and time pressures at work.

CONCLUSIONS
Our findings support the importance of psychosocial risk factors for LBP, including adverse health beliefs and working conditions that encourage higher output.