Meeting the health and social care needs of pregnant asylum seekers; midwifery students' perspectives: Part 3; "The pregnant woman within the global context"; an inclusive model for midwifery education to address the needs of asylum seeking women in the UK.

Nurse education today

PubMedID: 22647390

Haith-Cooper M, Bradshaw G. Meeting the health and social care needs of pregnant asylum seekers; midwifery students' perspectives: Part 3; "The pregnant woman within the global context"; an inclusive model for midwifery education to address the needs of asylum seeking women in the UK. Nurse Educ Today. 2013;33(9):1045-50.
AIM
to describe the conceptualisation and development of an inclusive educational model. The model is designed to facilitate pre-registration midwifery students' learning around the health and social care needs of pregnant women seeking asylum in the United Kingdom.

BACKGROUND
current literature has identified a concern about the standard of maternity care experienced by asylum seeking women accessing maternity services in the United Kingdom. In response to this, a doctorate study was undertaken which focused on examining the way in which a group of midwifery students approached the provision of care for asylum seekers. This study revealed difficulties that these students had both in identifying these women's needs and also in the wider care issues in practice. Consequently, one of the recommendations was to ameliorate these difficulties through midwifery education.

METHODS
the key findings from this study were used together with relevant supporting literature to construct "the pregnant woman within the global context" model for midwifery education.

RESULTS
The model is designed to facilitate a holistic assessment of need rather than focusing on the physical assessment at the expense of other aspects of care. It incorporates wider factors, on a global level, which could impact on the health and social care needs of a pregnant woman seeking asylum. It also prompts students to consider the influence of dominant discourses on perceptions of asylum seek;ing and is designed to encourage students' to question these discourses.

RECOMMENDATIONS
this model can be used in midwifery education to prepare students in caring for pregnant women seeking asylum. It may be especially helpful when students have close contact with pregnant women seeking asylum, for example through caseloading. Further research is recommended to evaluate the effectiveness of this model in enhancing the care of asylum seeking women in the United Kingdom.