Plausible role of naringenin against cerebrally implanted C6 glioma cells in rats.

Molecular and cellular biochemistry

PubMedID: 23263903

Sabarinathan D, Vanisree AJ. Plausible role of naringenin against cerebrally implanted C6 glioma cells in rats. Mol Cell Biochem. 2013;375(1-2):171-8.
Gliomas encompass a significant percentage of intrinsic neoplasms of the central nervous system in both adults and children. The constitutive activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B is the hallmark of glioma. The up-regulated protein kinase B could influence the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, an indicator of aggressive glioma. The present study was embarked to demonstrate the effect of naringenin (50 mg/kg bw for 30 days administrated orally) on PI3K, protein kinase B, and cyclooxygenase-2 in cerebrally implanted rat C6 glioma model. After the experimental period of 30 days, the animals were sacrificed and excised brain tissues were subjected to study the expressions of PI3K, protein kinase B, and cyclooxygenase-2 by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction followed Western blot analysis. The activity of COX-2 (production of prostaglandin-E(2)) was also determined by high pressure liquid chromatography. The results showed that the naringenin could down-regulate the expressions of PI3K and protein kinase B along with activity and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in C6 glioma cells implanted rat brain. In conclusion, it can be argued that the reduced expressions of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase B in naringenin-treated glioma-induced rat brain might be involved in the down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression and activity. Thus, fine-tuned investigation of which will be helpful for targeted drug discovery against glioma.