Significant association of glutathione S-transferase T1 null genotype with esophageal cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

Molecular biology reports

PubMedID: 23238916

Cai Y, Wang J. Significant association of glutathione S-transferase T1 null genotype with esophageal cancer risk: a meta-analysis. Mol Biol Rep. 2013;40(3):2397-403.
Recent studies on the association between glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) polymorphism and risk of esophageal cancer showed inconclusive results. To clarify this possible association, we conducted a meta-analysis of published studies. Data were collected from the following electronic databases: Pubmed, Embase, and Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM). The odds ratio (OR) and its 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) was used to assess the strength of this association. We summarized the data on the association between GSTT1 null genotype and risk of esophageal cancer in the overall population, and performed subgroup analyses by ethnicity. Finally, a total of 24 independent studies including a total of 7,801 subjects (2,965 cases and 4,836 controls) were eligible for meta-analysis. In the overall analysis, there was no significant association between GSTT1 null genotype and esophageal cancer risk (OR = 1.15, 95 % CI 0.99-1.33, P = 0.067). However, meta-analysis of adjusted ORs showed a significant association between GSTT1 null genotype and increased risk of esophageal cancer (OR = 1.30, 95 % CI 1.08-1.56, P = 0.005). Subgroup analyses by ethnicity showed there was an obvious association between GSTT1 null genotype and increased risk of esophageal cancer in East Asians (OR = 1.24, 95 % CI 1.10-1.39, P < 0.001), but not in Caucasians (OR = 0.89, 95 % CI 0.71-1.11, P = 0.300). There was no obvious risk of publication bias in this meta-analysis (Egger's test, P = 0.784). This meta-analysis demonstrates that GSTT1 null genotype is independently associated with increased risk of esophageal cancer, and a race-specific effect may exist in this association.