Decreased susceptibility to motion sickness during exposure to visual inversion in microgravity.

Aviation, space, and environmental medicine

PubMedID: 2012565

Lackner JR, DiZio P. Decreased susceptibility to motion sickness during exposure to visual inversion in microgravity. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1991;62(3):206-11.
Head and body movements made in microgravity tend to bring on symptoms of motion sickness. Such head movements, relative to comparable ones made on Earth, are accompanied by unusual combinations of semicircular canal and otolith activity owing to the unloading of the otoliths in OG. Head movements also bring on symptoms of motion sickness during exposure to visual inversion (or reversal) on Earth because the vestibulo-ocular reflex is rendered anti-compensatory. Here, we present evidence that susceptibility to motion sickness during exposure to visual inversion is decreased in a 0G relative to a 1G force background. This difference in susceptibility appears related to the alteration in otolith function in 0G. Some implications of this finding for the etiology of space motion sickness are described.