Thymic pseudotumorous enlargement due to follicular hyperplasia in a human immunodeficiency virus sero-positive patient. Immunohistochemical and molecular biological study of viral infected cells.

American journal of clinical pathology

PubMedID: 1543167

Prevot S, Audouin J, Andre-Bougaran J, Griffais R, Le Tourneau A, Fournier JG, Diebold J. Thymic pseudotumorous enlargement due to follicular hyperplasia in a human immunodeficiency virus sero-positive patient. Immunohistochemical and molecular biological study of viral infected cells. Am J Clin Pathol. 1992;97(3):420-5.
An enlargement of the thymus suggesting a tumor was discovered in a 28-year-old man who had early-stage acquired immune deficiency syndrome. A biopsy was performed. The adipose involuted thymus, with persistence of many Hassall's corpuscles, was judged to be a large lymphoid follicular hyperplasia. This follicular hyperplasia was similar to that previously described for lymph nodes, spleen, and other lymphoid tissues at earlier stages of human immunodeficiency virus infection, before the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Human immunodeficiency virus RNA and p24 human immunodeficiency virus protein were detected in the hyperplastic germinal centers (lymphocytes and follicular dendritic infected cells), and also in many cells that may have been either lymphocytes and/or epithelial cells in the interfollicular areas. The tissue was negative for Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences, as determined by the polymerase chain reaction. These observations identify the first state of infection of the thymus in a human immune deficiency virus-infected adult, preceding the severe involution with lymphoid depletion observed in all fatal cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in which the thymus has been analyzed.