[HIV testing among women in delivery rooms in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo: a catch-up strategy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission].

Revue d'epidemiologie et de sante publique

PubMedID: 23337841

Mwembo-Tambwe AN, Kalenga MK, Donnen P, Humblet P, Chenge M, Dramaix M, Buekens P. [HIV testing among women in delivery rooms in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo: a catch-up strategy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission]. Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 2013;61(1):21-7.
BACKGROUND
Although HIV testing is offered during antenatal care, the proportion of women giving birth without knowing their HIV status is still important in DR Congo. The objective of this study was to determine the acceptability of rapid HIV testing among parturients in labor room, and to identify factors that are associated with the acceptability of HIV testing.

METHODS
Intervention including rapid HIV testing among pregnant women in labor rooms in Lubumbashi for 5 months, from September 2010 to February 2011. Pregnant women who tested HIV positive were attended by prevention of mother-to-child transmission service. Descriptive statistical analysis and logistic regression were performed.

RESULTS
Among 474 pregnant women who enter the labor room, 433 (91.4%; confidence interval [CI]: 95%: 88.4-93.7%) had voluntary testing for HIV in the labor room after counseling. The acceptance of rapid testing for HIV was significantly higher when the duration of counseling was less or equal to 5 minutes (adjusted Odds ratio [aOR]=5.8; [CI] 95%: 2.6-13); among those who did not report having this screening test during antenatal care (aOR=3.8; [CI] 95%: 2-7.8), among those who were in early labor (aOR=2.3; [CI] 95%: 1.2-4.7) and lower in adolescents than in adults (aOR=0.1; [CI] 95%: 0.0-0.7).

CONCLUSION
Counseling and voluntary HIV testing are accepted in our labor rooms. Consistently offering this service in the labor room could be a catch-up strategy to be combined with antenatal care testing.