Atrial natriuretic peptide is involved in the ACTH response to stress and glucocorticoid negative feedback in the rat.

The Journal of endocrinology

PubMedID: 1331286

Fink G, Dow RC, Casley D, Johnston CI, Bennie J, Carroll S, Dick H. Atrial natriuretic peptide is involved in the ACTH response to stress and glucocorticoid negative feedback in the rat. J Endocrinol. 1992;135(1):37-43.
The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in the ACTH response to stress and the glucocorticoid negative feedback control of ACTH release was investigated in adult male homozygous Brattleboro and adrenalectomized Wistar rats respectively, using the technique of immunoneutralization. The relatively low ACTH response to stress and the lack of arginine vasopressin make the homozygous Brattleboro rat a more rigorous and simpler preparation in which to test the hypothesis that ANP is involved in the ACTH response to stress. In both sets of experiments, blood sampling and injection of sheep anti-ANP or control serum were carried out in conscious animals through intra-atrial cannulae implanted 2 days previously under halothane anaesthesia. A 30-s exposure to ether resulted in a brisk twofold increase in the plasma ACTH concentrations in homozygous Brattleboro rats infused with anti-ANP, but not control serum. The injection of either dexamethasone, a potent glucocorticoid receptor agonist, or corticosterone resulted in a rapid and marked reduction in the plasma concentrations of ACTH in Wistar rats which had been adrenalectomized, under halothane anaesthesia, at least 21 days before experimentation. The inhibitory action of dexamethasone, but not corticosterone, was significantly reduced in animals infused with anti-ANP serum. These results show that the inhibition of ANP release into hypophysial portal blood is probably important for triggering the ACTH response to stress and that ANP may play a role in corticosteroid negative feedback control of ACTH release mediated by type II (glucocorticoid) receptors.