Thrombocyte adhesion and release of extracellular microvesicles correlate with surface morphology of adsorbent polymers for lipid apheresis.

Biomacromolecules

PubMedID: 24844344

Weiss R, Spittler A, Schmitz G, Fischer MB, Weber V. Thrombocyte adhesion and release of extracellular microvesicles correlate with surface morphology of adsorbent polymers for lipid apheresis. Biomacromolecules. 2014;.
Whole blood lipid apheresis is clinically applied to reduce low density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Here, we studied the correlation between physico-chemical parameters, in particular surface roughness, and blood compatibility of two polyacrylate-based and a dextran sulphate-based polymer for lipid apheresis. The adsorbent surface roughness was assessed by atomic force microscopy. Freshly isolated human thrombocytes were circulated over adsorbent columns downscaled equivalent to clinical use to study thrombocyte adhesion and microvesicle generation. Quantification of thrombocytes and microvesicles in the flow-through of the columns revealed that both thrombocyte adhesion and microvesicle generation increased with increasing adsorbent surface roughness. Activation of thrombocytes with thrombin receptor-activating peptide-6 favored their adhesion to the adsorbents, as demonstrated by preferential depletion of CD62+ and PAC-1+ thrombocytes. Taken together, enhanced polymer surface roughness fosters cell adhesion and microvesicle release, underscoring the role of extracellular microvesicles as markers of cellular activation and of blood compatibility.