Improvement of a Woman's Alcohol-Related Dementia via Off-label Memantine Treatment: A 16-Month Clinical Observation.

The Annals of pharmacotherapy

PubMedID: 24989175

Bonnet U, Taazimi B, Borda T, Grabbe HD. Improvement of a Woman's Alcohol-Related Dementia via Off-label Memantine Treatment: A 16-Month Clinical Observation. Ann Pharmacother. 2014;.
OBJECTIVE
To report a case of long-term treatment of moderate alcohol-related dementia (ARD) with memantine.

CASE SUMMARY
We present the case of a 48-year-old German woman with a long history of alcohol dependence and cognitive impairments, who was diagnosed with moderate ARD (according to ICD-10 criteria) after having ruled out other dementias. Her cognitive functioning improved with off-label use of memantine (up to 20 mg/d) under abstinent conditions. Discontinuation and reinstitution of memantine were associated with a worsening and an improving of her cognitive performance, respectively, which was documented in neuropsychiatric tests. The patient had 2 alcohol relapses during this study. Only the first relapse was associated with discontinuation of memantine and cognitive deterioration. The second relapse happened during receiving of memantine and was not associated with a decline in cognitive functioning. After 16 months of treatment, moderate ARD had been improved to the grade of an amnestic mild cognitive impairment (according to DemTect) and to mild dementia (according to Clinical Dementia Rating Scale), respectively.

DISCUSSION
The on-off-on pattern of the memantine treatment supports the assumption that this antidementia agent played a key role in the improvement of ARD. An alcohol relapse did not attenuate the improvement of cognition with memantine.

CONCLUSION
The use of memantine improved cognitive functioning of a female patient with ARD.