Parenting and the behavior problems of young children with an intellectual disability: concurrent and longitudinal relationships in a population-based study.

American journal on intellectual and developmental disabilities

PubMedID: 25148056

Totsika V, Hastings RP, Vagenas D, Emerson E. Parenting and the behavior problems of young children with an intellectual disability: concurrent and longitudinal relationships in a population-based study. Am J Intellect Dev Disabil. 2014;119(5):422-35.
Abstract We examined parenting behaviors, and their association with concurrent and later child behavior problems. Children with an intellectual disability (ID) were identified from a UK birth cohort (N ?=? 516 at age 5). Compared to parents of children without an ID, parents of children with an ID used discipline less frequently, but reported a more negative relationship with their child. Among children with an ID, discipline, and home atmosphere had no long-term association with behavior problems, whereas relationship quality did: closer relationships were associated with fewer concurrent and later child behavior problems. Increased parent-child conflict was associated with greater concurrent and later behavior problems. Parenting programs in ID could target parent-child relationship quality as a potential mediator of behavioral improvements in children.