Macrophage activation for tumor cytotoxicity: induction of tumoricidal macrophages by supernatants of PPD-stimulated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-immune spleen cell cultures.

Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)

PubMedID: 330759

Ruco LP, Meltzer MS. Macrophage activation for tumor cytotoxicity: induction of tumoricidal macrophages by supernatants of PPD-stimulated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-immune spleen cell cultures. J Immunol. 1977;119(3):889-96.
Resident peritoneal macrophages from normal mice were activated for tumor cytotoxicity in vitro by co-cultivation with BCG1-immune spleen cells and PPD and by incubation with supernatants of PPD-stimulated BCG-immune spleen cell cultures (lymphokine supernatants). Lymphokine activation of macrophages occurred in unfractionated PC suspensions as well as in macrophage monolayers depleted of nonadherent PC. Tumor cytotoxicity by lymphokine-activated macrophages was evident by 3 to 4 hr of culture in active supernatants, reached maximal levels by 8 to 12 hr. and was absent by 20 hr. Continued incubation in lymphokines or even re-exposure after washing did not maintain macrophage cytotoxicity. The capacity of normal resident macrophages to be activated by lymphokines in vitro progressively decreased and was absent by 20 hr in culture. This decrease did not necessarily reflect cell death; macrophage viability as estimated by exclusion of trypan blue or by phagocytic responses did not change over the 20-hr culture period. The short lived nature of both macrophage tumoricidal capacity and capacity of precursor cells to be activated by lymphokines may function as negative feedback mechanisms in immune reactions.