Regulation of the activity of histamine-N-methyltransferase from guinea pig skin by biogenic amines.

Experimental and molecular pathology

PubMedID: 3792510

Tachibana T, Taniguchi S, Fujiwara M, Imamura S. Regulation of the activity of histamine-N-methyltransferase from guinea pig skin by biogenic amines. Exp Mol Pathol. 1986;45(3):257-69.
Histamine-N-methyltransferase, a major histamine-degrading enzyme in the skin, was purified from guinea pig skin about 150-fold. The enzymological characteristics including pH optimum, Km values for substrates, and molecular weight were almost consistent with those reported in the brain. Regulatory mechanism of the enzyme activity by biogenic amines was investigated using the purified specimen. Serotonin, tryptamine, and 5-methoxytryptamine intensely inhibited the activity while tryptophan, melatonin, N-acetylserotonin, tryptophol, and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid had no significant effects. Dopamine, tyramine, 3-methyltyramine, and phenylethylamine also inhibited the activity while no particular effects were obtained by adrenaline, noradrenaline, tyrosine, and DOPA. Spermidine and cadaverine caused significant but weaker inhibition. These amines acted competitively with respect to histamine, although varying manners were observed with respect to S-adenosyl-L-methionine. From these results, it was concluded that the enzyme activity was inhibited by such compounds in which a certain chemical structure, CH2-CH2-NH2 group neighboring the hydrophobic group, was contained. A possible mechanism of inhibition by the amines is postulated, and possible roles of such compounds in the inflammation by impairing the histamine metabolism is discussed.