Induction of transmissible lymphomas in Syrian hamsters by application of DNA from viral hamster papovavirus-induced tumors and by cell-free filtrates from human tumors.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

PubMedID: 5271745

Graffi A, Bender E, Schramm T, Kuhn W, Schneiders F. Induction of transmissible lymphomas in Syrian hamsters by application of DNA from viral hamster papovavirus-induced tumors and by cell-free filtrates from human tumors. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 1969;64(4):1172-5.
DNA isolated from skin epitheliomas containing papovavirus induced lymphomas within four to eight weeks in 40 to 50 per cent of newborn Syrian hamsters injected. This DNA effect was eliminated by DNase but not by RNase and was not induced by DNA preparations of transplanted epitheliomas or the induced lymphomas. Lymphomas were similarly induced by cellfree filtrates from certain human tumors such as gastric carcinomas and ovarian tumors. Little or no lymphoma effects were observed following injections with filtrates derived from normal human or animal tissues or human blood. The lymphomas induced by DNA and human tumors were transmissible by cell-free filtrates to newborn Syrian hamsters; however, successful serial passage, like the primary lymphomas induced by the DNA preparations, depended upon the use of a newborn hamster from a special breeding colony of hamsters.