Wilms' tumor-aniridia association: segregation of affected chromosome in somatic cell hybrids, identification of cell surface antigen associated with deleted area, and regional mapping of c-Ha-ras-1 oncogene, insulin gene, and beta-globin gene.

Somatic cell and molecular genetics

PubMedID: 6089356

Fisher JH, Miller YE, Sparkes RS, Bateman JB, Kimmel KA, Carey TE, Rodell T, Shoemaker SA, Scoggin CH. Wilms' tumor-aniridia association: segregation of affected chromosome in somatic cell hybrids, identification of cell surface antigen associated with deleted area, and regional mapping of c-Ha-ras-1 oncogene, insulin gene, and beta-globin gene. Somat Cell Mol Genet. 1984;10(5):455-64.
Fusion of an auxotrophic mutant hamster cell with the skin fibroblasts of a child with the Wilms' tumor-aniridia association produced clones which, on the one hand, contained the child's normal chromosome 11 and, on the other, the chromosome 11 with the 11p13 deletion associated with the syndrome. Both hybrids were positive for human LDH-A by enzymatic assay. Clones containing the normal human chromosome 11 were killed by a cytotoxic monoclonal antibody to a cell surface antigen previously mapped to the 11p13----11pter region of chromosome 11. Clones with the abnormal 11 were not killed. Thus, we have produced hybrids from the same patient distinct from each other on the basis of their chromosome 11. These hybrids have been used to map the locus for a cell surface antigen to the deleted region on chromosome 11 of a patient with the Wilms tumor-aniridia association. The linkage between this antigen and the syndrome should be helpful in further study of the genetics of this disease. In addition, we have found that the c-Ha-ras-1 oncogene is distal to the p13 region of chromosome 11 and the position of insulin and beta-globin on the chromosome. Finally, by producing segregants of the hybrids containing the abnormal chromosome 11, we have provided evidence that chromosome 11-associated c-Ha-ras-1 is syntenic with chromosome 11 and not moved to a different portion of the genome.