Immobilized catecholamine and cocaine effects on contractility of cardiac muscle.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

PubMedID: 4515619

Venter JC, Ross J, Dixon JE, Mayer SE, Kaplan NO. Immobilized catecholamine and cocaine effects on contractility of cardiac muscle. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 1973;70(4):1214-7.
Isoproterenol, norepinephrine, and epinephrine covalently bound to glass beads exert a positive inotropic effect on isometrically contracting papillary muscles from cats. Immobilized isoproterenol maintains increases in force and velocity of contraction for more than 5 hr. 1 muM Cocaine potentiates the action of immobilized norepinephrine, isoproterenol, and epinephrine, but not of isoproterenol in solution. The data presented indicate that the effects of immobilized catecholamines are not due to their coming off the glass. The effects observed with cocaine and immobilized catecholamines are not altered by prior treatment of the muscle with reserpine. These results suggest that the major site of catecholamine action is on receptors located on the extended surface of myocardial cells and a post-junctional site for cocaine potentiation.