In vitro study of human skeletal muscle strips: effect of nonesterified fatty acid supply on glucose storage.

Metabolism : clinical and experimental

PubMedID: 2687637

Argyraki M, Wright PD, Venables CW, Proud G, Taylor R. In vitro study of human skeletal muscle strips: effect of nonesterified fatty acid supply on glucose storage. Metab Clin Exp. 1989;38(12):1183-7.
To examine the effect of increased nonesterified fatty acid concentration on glucose storage in human muscle, an in vitro method for study of glycogen synthesis in this tissue has been established. Muscle strips obtained from rectus abdominus during elective abdominal surgery were clamped at resting length, and adenosine triphosphate/total adenosine nucleotide ratios remained constant for 3 hours ex vivo. Leakage of enzyme markers of muscle damage was minimal, and electron microscopy showed preserved myofibril ultrastructure. Insulin stimulation brought about a dose-dependent increase in rates of glycogen synthesis with a half-maximal effect at 9 x 10(-10) mol/L insulin. In 15 consecutive studies, basal rates of glycogen synthesis were 4.1 +/- 0.5, 3.2 +/- 0.7, and 3.0 +/- 0.3 nmol glucose/25 mg/h in the absence of palmitate, with 1.4 mmol/L and 2.8 mmol/L palmitate, respectively. Insulin-stimulated rates of glycogen synthesis were 8.6 +/- 1.2, 6.0 +/- 1.8, and 5.8 +/- 0.8 nmol glucose/25 mg/h. Thus, increasing fatty acid concentrations decreased rates of glycogen synthesis both basally and with insulin stimulation. The insulin signal itself was not affected as the percentage stimulation over basal rates remained approximately constant in the presence or absence of fatty acid (2.1-, 1.9- and 1.9-fold, respectively). Insulin sensitivity in vivo is usually expressed as absolute rates of glucose uptake during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia, and if plasma fatty acid elevation were to be studied in vivo an erroneous conclusion may be reached of resistance to hormone action per se.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)