Is a compromised interferon response an etiologic factor in Reye's syndrome?

Canadian Medical Association journal

PubMedID: 6176306

Rozee KR, Lee SH, Crocker JF, Digout S, Arcinue E. Is a compromised interferon response an etiologic factor in Reye's syndrome?. Can Med Assoc J. 1982;126(7):798-802.
Young mice injected with sublethal doses of Toximul MP8, a typical commercial polyoxyethylene ether-based emulsifier, died more frequently when infected with encephalomyocarditis virus than did control mice. Lymphocytes taken from emulsifier-injected mice responded poorly to interferon induction, unlike lymphocytes from control animals. Interferon protected control mice against viral encephalomyocarditis, but such protection was not equally demonstrable in emulsifier-injected mice. These data suggest that the enhanced lethality of encephalomyocarditis virus in emulsifier-injected mice is associated with and perhaps caused by a compromised interferon response in these animals. Since these emulsifiers are commonly found in the environment in areas where forests are sprayed with pesticides, a group of children suffering from Reye's syndrome who lived in such areas was investigated. Blood samples were obtained from five children with influenza B-associated Reye's syndrome during their acute illness and during convalescence. Lymphocytes obtained from these samples and from peripheral blood samples from healthy children (controls) were induced to synthesize interferon by exposure to Newcastle disease virus. The lymphocytes from the convalescent patients and from the controls responded well to induction. However, the lymphocytes obtained from patients and from the controls responded well to induction. However, the lymphocytes obtained from patients during the acute phase of Reye's syndrome responded very poorly and produced significantly less interferon.