Stomatal behavior and water relations of waterlogged tomato plants.

Plant physiology

PubMedID: 16662706

Bradford KJ, Hsiao TC. Stomatal behavior and water relations of waterlogged tomato plants. Plant Physiol. 1982;70(5):1508-13.
The effects of waterlogging the soil on leaf water potential, leaf epidermal conductance, transpiration, root conductance to water flow, and petiole epinasty have been examined in the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Stomatal conductance and transpiration are reduced by 30% to 40% after approximately 24 hours of soil flooding. This is not due to a transient water deficit, as leaf water potential is unchanged, even though root conductance is decreased by the stress. The stomatal response apparently prevents any reduction in leaf water potential. Experiments with varied time of flooding, root excision, and stem girdling provide indirect evidence for an influence of roots in maintaining stomatal opening potential. This root-effect cannot be entirely accounted for by alterations in source-sink relationships. Although 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, the immediate precursor of ethylene, is transported from the roots to the shoots of waterlogged tomato plants, it has no direct effect on stomatal conductance. Ethylene-induced petiole epinasty develops coincident with partial stomatal closure in waterlogged plants. Leaf epinasty may have beneficial effects on plant water balance by reducing light interception.