A microsphere study on the effects of somatostatin and secretin on regional blood flow in anesthetized dogs.

Regulatory peptides

PubMedID: 6129683

Becker RH, Scholtholt J, Schölkens BA, Jung W, Speth O. A microsphere study on the effects of somatostatin and secretin on regional blood flow in anesthetized dogs. Regul Pept. 1982;4(6):341-51.
The endogenous peptides somatostatin and secretin are effective in the therapy of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding and acute pancreatitis. The clinical effects may be partly brought about by changes in the regional blood flow. To evaluate the effects of somatostatin (50 and 100 micrograms/min over 6-8 min) and secretin (0.1 and 0.5 U X kg-1 X min-1 over 3-5 min) on tissue blood flow, particularly of the gastrointestinal tract, the tracer microsphere reference sample method was used in anesthetized dogs. Infusion of somatostatin significantly diminished gastric and pancreatic blood flow whereas no changes of duodenal and ileal blood flow could be obtained. Blood flow through spleen, kidneys and adrenal glands was increased but no changes were observed in the blood flow of other tissues. Cardiac hemodynamics remained unchanged. Secretin increased the blood flow of the duodenum, the kidneys and the adrenal glands and diminished gastric blood flow without changing pancreatic, ileal, hepatic, pulmonary and muscle blood flow. Cerebral, pituitary and myocardial blood flow was increased by a higher dose of secretin. It also evoked a slight but significant positive ino- and chronotropic effect. Since secretin and somatostatin differ in their respective effects on gastrointestinal blood flow it is suggested that the previously reported beneficial effects of both peptides on upper gastrointestinal bleeding cannot solely be attributed to changes in regional blood flow.