Possible derivation of the laboratory mouse genome from multiple wild Mus species.

Genetics

PubMedID: 2879770

Blank RD, Campbell GR, D'Eustachio P. Possible derivation of the laboratory mouse genome from multiple wild Mus species. Genetics. 1986;114(4):1257-69.
Laboratory strains of mice are thought to be derived from wild populations of Mus domesticus. Many instances of non-domesticus genetic information fixed in these strains have been described, however, and the amount of strain-to-strain genetic variation exceeds that found in wild domesticus populations. In order to estimate the extent of the non-domesticus contribution to laboratory mouse genomes, and to determine whether it could account for observed variation, we have used computer simulations to investigate the properties of genetically marked chromosomal segments and the distribution of residual allogenicity at various times during inbreeding. A locus or chromosomal segment is allogenic if it is unfixed within a lineage at a given time. The odds of fixation of a foreign chromosome segment are predicted to be an exponentially decreasing function of its length. The median segment length is predicted to be 17 centimorgans. Available data for markers of chromosomes 1, 9 and 12 in recombinant inbred strain sets conform to these predictions. Together, the results suggest that introgression of non-domesticus chromosomes and segregation of residual allogenicity are sufficient to account for the genetic diversity observed among inbred mouse strains and substrains.