Cellular heat acclimation regulates cell growth, cell morphology, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, and expression of aquaporins in mouse fibroblast cells.

Cellular physiology and biochemistry : international journal of experimental cellular physiology, biochemistry, and pharmacology

PubMedID: 22814242

Sugimoto N, Shido O, Matsuzaki K, Ohno-Shosaku T, Hitomi Y, Tanaka M, Sawaki T, Fujita Y, Kawanami T, Masaki Y, Okazaki T, Nakamura H, Koizumi S, Yachie A, Umehara H. Cellular heat acclimation regulates cell growth, cell morphology, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, and expression of aquaporins in mouse fibroblast cells. Cell Physiol Biochem. 2012;30(2):450-7.
The heat shock response has been extensively studied by a number of investigators to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the cellular response to severe heat stress (higher than 42°C). But, body or tissue temperature increases by only a few degrees Celsius during physiological events. Therefore, the physiological cellular response to mild heat stress rather than severe heat stress is likely to be more important. Repeated exposure to hyperthermia for consecutive 5 days induces heat acclimation which is an adaptive physiological process in humans and animals. However, thus far, the effect of continuous exposure to heat stress on cells has not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated an adaptive physiological process that is induced in culture cells by continuous exposure to mild heat stress for 5 days. Exposure to heat activated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase; inhibited cell growth without apoptosis; and increased the levels of HSPs and HSF-1 in mouse fibroblast cells. Interestingly, exposure to heat regulated the expression of aquaporins and induced morphological change. In a physiological sense, these results suggested that continuous exposure to mild heat stress for 5 days, in which heat acclimation is attained in humans and animals, might induce molecular adaptation to heat in cells.