Diastolic dysfunction measured by tissue Doppler imaging in children with end-stage renal disease: a report of the RICH-Q study.

Cardiology in the young

PubMedID: 23462068

Schoenmaker NJ, Kuipers IM, van der Lee JH, Tromp WF, van Dyck M, Gewillig M, Blom NA, Groothoff JW. Diastolic dysfunction measured by tissue Doppler imaging in children with end-stage renal disease: a report of the RICH-Q study. Cardiol Young. 2013;1-9.
Introduction: Early detection of cardiovascular disease in children with end-stage renal disease is essential in order to prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in early adulthood. Tissue Doppler imaging has shown to be a promising method to detect and quantify subtle abnormalities in diastolic function. We therefore compared assessment of diastolic function by conventional echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging. Methods: We performed conventional echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging in 38 children with end-stage renal disease and 76 healthy controls. We compared outcomes on parameters related to diastolic function (E/a ratio for conventional echocardiography and E/E' ratio for tissue Doppler imaging) for both groups using multiple linear regression analysis. Diastolic dysfunction was defined as E/a ratio <1 or E/E' ratio > 95th percentile for age. To assess the intra-observer reproducibility, the coefficient of variation was calculated. Results: Children with end-stage renal disease had on average a lower E/a ratio (p = 0.004) and a higher mitral and septal E/E' ratio (both p < 0.001) compared with controls. In all, two children with end-stage renal disease (5%) had diastolic dysfunction according to the E/a ratio, 11 according to the mitral E/E' ratio (29%), and 16 according to the septal E/E' ratio (42%) compared with none of the controls (p = 0.109, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). The coefficients of variation of the mitral (7%) and septal E/E' ratio (4%) were smaller than the coefficient of variation of the E/a ratio (11%). Conclusions: Tissue Doppler imaging is a more sensitive and reliable method to detect diastolic dysfunction than conventional E/a ratio in children with end-stage renal disease.