Prospective trial of gasless laparoscopic Burch colposuspension using conventional surgical instruments.

The Journal of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists

PubMedID: 15200775

Davila GW, Stanford E, Korn A. Prospective trial of gasless laparoscopic Burch colposuspension using conventional surgical instruments. J Am Assoc Gynecol Laparosc. 2004;11(2):197-203.
STUDY OBJECTIVE
To prospectively evaluate the use of gasless laparoscopy techniques in the performance of a traditional Burch colposuspension in women with urodynamically-demonstrated genuine stress incontinence and urethral hypermobility.

DESIGN
Multicenter, prospective, single-intervention series (Canadian Task Force Classification II-2).

SETTING
Three urogynecologic referral centers.

PATIENTS
Fifty-eight women.

INTERVENTION
Traditional Burch colposuspension performed utilizing gasless laparoscopic access and conventional surgical instruments.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS
Follow-up was 12 to 38 months. On pad testing, urine loss was significantly reduced, from 6.0 g (CI: 0.55-11.45) to 0.3 g (CI: 0-1.53). Average daily incontinence episodes based on 7-day voiding diaries decreased from 4.7 (CI: 0.87-8.53) to 0.3 (CI: 0-1.58). Q-tip angles were normalized: 49.8 degrees (CI: 40.86-58.74) to 10 degrees (CI: 1.49-18.51). Ninety-five percent of subjects reported resolution of stress incontinence. Three subjects (5%) reported recurrent/persistent genuine stress incontinence: one was operated on during the postpartum period while breastfeeding, and two developed intrinsic sphincteric deficiency postoperatively. Fifty-five percent of subjects underwent other pelvic reconstructive surgery including posterior wall repairs. Average operative time was 60.8 minutes (range, 40-92). The ideal candidate has an unscarred abdominal wall.

CONCLUSION
Gasless laparoscopic access was used to effectively perform traditional Burch colposuspension using conventional open surgical instruments. Bladder neck hypermobility was normalized in all subjects, and 95% of subjects reported no further stress incontinence.