Differences between Effects of Undissociated and Anionic 2,4-Dinitrophenol on Permeability of Barley Roots.

Plant physiology

PubMedID: 16662682

Jackson PC. Differences between Effects of Undissociated and Anionic 2,4-Dinitrophenol on Permeability of Barley Roots. Plant Physiol. 1982;70(5):1373-9.
Effects of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and several other substituted phenols on permeability of barley roots (Hordeum vulgare var. Trebi) to ions were assayed as a function of pH and phenol concentration. Solutions containing 0.1 micromolar undissociated DNP increase the permeability of barley root cells to small ions such as K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), and Cl(-) with no inhibition of respiration. Undissociated forms of the other phenols increase permeability also, but they are less effective than DNP. Only the undissociated DNP is effective. Anionic DNP does not increase permeability or inhibit ion uptake, although it is the major species accumulated by the roots, both at pH 5 and pH 7. At pH 7, in contrast to pH 5, 10 micromolar DNP has no effect on ion permeability of barley roots yet it uncouples oxidative phosphorylation of barley root mitochondria. This indicates that the all too common use of DNP as a test for active transport or involvement of ATP synthesis can be misleading.