Immunoreactive cholecystokinin in human and rat plasma: correlation of pancreatic secretion in response to CCK.

Regulatory peptides

PubMedID: 6095373

Izzo RS, Brugge WR, Praissman M. Immunoreactive cholecystokinin in human and rat plasma: correlation of pancreatic secretion in response to CCK. Regul Pept. 1984;9(1-2):21-34.
Immunoreactive cholecystokinin (CCK) levels in human and rat plasma are described using a radioimmunoassay specific for the biologically active sulfated end of CCK. This assay detected significant changes in plasma cholecystokinin levels during intrajejunal administration of amino acids and intravenous infusions of CCK-8 which were followed by increased pancreatic secretion. In humans, the concentration (pg/ml) of plasma cholecystokinin increased from 10.8 to 18.9 following intrajejunal amino acid instillation and from 15.4 to 31.1 during CCK infusion, while pancreatic trypsin secretion increased more than 15 fold. Ingestion of a test meal also caused a rapid and significant elevation (P less than 0.05) in both plasma CCK (14.5-21.7 pg/ml) and gastrin (50-160 pg/ml) levels. In the rat, an injection of 46 ng of CCK-8 produced a 300% increase in immunoreactive plasma CCK levels (2 min) and caused peak pancreatic protein secretion within 5 min; 4 fold lower doses (11.5 ng) elevated plasma CCK by 38% and pancreatic protein secretion to a small but significant extent. The ability of this assay to detect various forms of sulfated CCK in human plasma was also determined. Following gel chromatography on Sephadex G-50, at least three different immunoreactive peaks were found in plasma from fasted subjects and after intrajejunal amino acid stimulation. While the lower molecular weight CCK peptides (CCK-8 and CCK-12) were detected in plasma from both fasted and stimulated subjects, the larger form (CCK-33) was only present in measurable concentrations after amino acid infusion. The simultaneous measurement of increased plasma CCK levels and pancreatic secretion and the changes in the distribution of CCK peptides following amino acid infusion provides strong support that this assay detects physiologically relevant changes in biologically active CCK peptides.