Genetic defects in dolichol metabolism.

Journal of inherited metabolic disease

PubMedID: 25270028

Buczkowska A, Swiezewska E, Lefeber DJ. Genetic defects in dolichol metabolism. J Inherit Metab Dis. 2015;38(1):157-69.
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) comprise a group of inborn errors of metabolism with abnormal glycosylation of proteins and lipids. Patients with defective protein N-glycosylation are identified in routine metabolic screening via analysis of serum transferrin glycosylation. Defects in the assembly of the dolichol linked Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 glycan and its transfer to proteins lead to the (partial) absence of complete glycans on proteins. These defects are called CDG-I and are located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or cytoplasm. Defects in the subsequent processing of protein bound glycans result in the presence of truncated glycans on proteins. These defects are called CDG-II and the enzymes involved are located mainly in the Golgi apparatus. In recent years, human defects have been identified in dolichol biosynthesis genes within the group of CDG-I patients. This has increased interest in dolichol metabolism, has resulted in specific recognizable clinical symptoms in CDG-I and has offered new mechanistic insights in dolichol biosynthesis. We here review its biosynthetic pathways, the clinical and biochemical phenotypes in dolichol-related CDG defects, up to the formation of dolichyl-P-mannose (Dol-P-Man), and discuss existing evidence of regulatory networks in dolichol metabolism to provide an outlook on therapeutic strategies.