Cell permeability: a factor in the biotin-oleate relationship in Lactobacillus arabinosus. II. Effect of oleic acid and other surfactants on free biotin uptake.

Journal of bacteriology

PubMedID: 6020402

Waller JR, Lichstein HC. Cell permeability: a factor in the biotin-oleate relationship in Lactobacillus arabinosus. II. Effect of oleic acid and other surfactants on free biotin uptake. J Bacteriol. 1967;93(1):151-5.
Bound biotin-saturated cells were incubated in the presence of biotin and glucose (37 C, pH 7.5) with or without oleic acid, Tween 20, 40, 60, and 80, Aerosol OT, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, Triton X-100, Non-Ion-Ox, and Haemo-Sol. With low concentrations (up to 5 mug/ml) and short reaction times (up to 10 min), oleic acid stimulated free biotin accumulation. Increased concentrations (10 to 50 mug/ml) or reaction times (10 to 30 min) caused progressive reductions in uptake or increased release of previously accumulated vitamin. Combination of Tween 40 (1 mg/ml) with oleic acid (up to 50 mug/ml) detoxified oleic acid and stimulated free biotin uptake. Oleic acid (5 mug/ml or more) reduced cell viability, an effect which was overcome by Tween 40. All other surfactants tested stimulated free biotin accumulation at sublethal concentrations. Aerosol OT and SDS exhibited the same degree of stimulatory activity as detoxified oleic acid; however, at concentrations higher than 200 mum, a rapid decrease in vitamin accumulation was observed which paralleled that caused by increased oleic acid concentrations. The results suggest that oleic acid and other surfactants affect the permeability of cells of Lactobacillus plantarum (formerly called L. arabinosus) in a similar manner.