Correlation between Renal Function and Common Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease in a Healthy Middle-Aged Population: A Prospective Observational 2-Year Study.

PloS one

PubMedID: 25396414

Ohno M, Deguchi F, Izumi K, Ishigaki H, Sarui H, Sasaki A, Segawa T, Yamaki T, Kojima T, Ohashi H. Correlation between Renal Function and Common Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease in a Healthy Middle-Aged Population: A Prospective Observational 2-Year Study. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(11):e113263.
BACKGROUND/AIMS
Age, proteinuria, metabolic syndrome, and hyperuricemia are the reported risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the best predictor of changes in renal function in the early stages of renal disease in a healthy middle-aged population is still unknown. Our study evaluated the correlation between changes in renal function and common risk factors to determine such a predictor.

METHODS
In total, 2,853 healthy persons aged =50 years participated in the study. They had no proteinuria and were not on medications for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or hyperuricemia. Over 2 years, participants underwent annual health screening. The relationship between changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and changes in risk factors for CKD was evaluated using univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses.

RESULTS
Over 2 years, eGFR showed a significant decrease. Univariate regression analysis revealed that changes in fasting plasma glucose (FPG), total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, serum uric acid levels, and hemoglobin showed a significant negative correlation with changes in eGFR. Multiple regression analysis confirmed that changes in FPG, serum uric acid levels, in particular, and hemoglobin had a significant negative correlation with changes in eGFR.

CONCLUSION
The changes in eGFR and other variables over 2 years were small and could be within expected biologic variation. A longer observational study is needed to elucidate whether FPG, serum uric acid and hemoglobin represent the earliest markers of eGFR decline.