Acute effects of arterial baroreflex on sympathetic nerve activity and plasma norepinephrine concentration.

Autonomic neuroscience : basic & clinical

PubMedID: 25458434

Kawada T, Akiyama T, Shimizu S, Sata Y, Turner MJ, Shirai M, Sugimachi M. Acute effects of arterial baroreflex on sympathetic nerve activity and plasma norepinephrine concentration. Auton Neurosci. 2014;186C62-68.
Arterial pressure (AP) elevates as a logarithmic function of exogenously administered dose of norepinephrine (NE). In contrast, AP is nearly linearly correlated with efferent sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) during acute baroreflex intervention. The present study aimed at quantifying the relationship between SNA and plasma NE concentration during acute baroreflex intervention. Carotid sinus regions were isolated from systemic circulation in five Wistar Kyoto rats, and carotid sinus pressure was changed among 60, 100, 120, 140, and 180mmHg every 2min. Arterial blood (0.2ml) was obtained at each pressure level for plasma NE measurement. Maximum AP and minimum AP were 153.34±6.28 and 67.31±4.92mmHg, respectively, in response to pressure perturbation. Plasma NE correlated linearly with SNA for individual animal data (slope: 0.957±0.090pg·ml(-1)·%(-1), intercept: 46.57±7.22pg/ml, r(2): ranged from 0.923 to 0.992) and also for group averaged data (NE=0.956×SNA+47.97, r(2)=0.982). Blockade of neuronal NE uptake by intravenous desipramine (1mg/kg) administration increased the slope (2.966±0.686pg·ml(-1)·%(-1), P<0.05) and the intercept (168.73±28.53pg/ml, P<0.01) of the plasma NE-SNA relationship. These results indicate that the relationship between SNA and plasma NE concentration was nearly linear within the normal physiological range of acute baroreflex control of AP. While plasma NE concentration can reflect changes in SNA, it may also overestimate the sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system when neuronal NE uptake is impaired systemically.