Does type 1 diabetes alter post-exercise thermoregulatory and cardiovascular function in young adults?

Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports

PubMedID: 25487370

McGinn R, Carter MR, Barrera-Ramirez J, Sigal RJ, Flouris AD, Kenny GP. Does type 1 diabetes alter post-exercise thermoregulatory and cardiovascular function in young adults?. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014;.
Recent data demonstrated that individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) exhibit impaired sweating and increased rectal temperature (i.e., heat storage) during exercise compared with healthy controls. Our purpose in this study was to investigate the consequences of T1DM on post-exercise thermal homeostasis. Sixteen participants (eight controls matched with eight T1DM) performed 90?min of cycling followed by 60?min of seated recovery. Esophageal and rectal temperatures, sweating (forearm, chest, and upper back), skin blood flow [forearm and upper back, presented as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)], and blood pressure [mean arterial pressure (MAP)] were measured at baseline and throughout recovery. Esophageal temperature was similar during baseline and recovery between groups (P?=?0.88). However, rectal temperature was elevated in our T1DM group throughout recovery (P?=?0.05). Sweating and CVC were similar between groups at all sites from 10-min post-exercise until the end of recovery (P?=?0.16). While absolute MAP was similar between groups (P?=?0.43), the overall decrease in MAP post-exercise was greater in controls from 20?min (T1DM: -?8?±?5 vs control: -?13?±?6?mmHg, P?=?0.03) until the end of recovery. We conclude that despite increased heat storage during exercise, individuals with T1DM exhibit a suppression in heat loss similar to their healthy counterparts during recovery.