Higher Serum Concentrations of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Associate with Prevalent Hypertension whereas Lower Associate with Incident Hypertension.

PloS one

PubMedID: 25658326

Seven E, Husemoen LL, Ibsen H, Friedrich N, Nauck M, Wachtell K, Linneberg A, Jeppesen JL. Higher Serum Concentrations of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Associate with Prevalent Hypertension whereas Lower Associate with Incident Hypertension. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(2):e0117864.
BACKGROUND
The role of the natriuretic peptides (NPs) in hypertension is complex. Thus, a higher blood NP concentration is a robust marker of pressure-induced cardiac damage in patients with hypertension, whereas genetically elevated NP concentrations are associated with a reduced risk of hypertension and overweight individuals presumably at high risk of hypertension have lower NP concentrations.

OBJECTIVE
To investigate the associations between serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), used as a surrogate marker for active BNP, and prevalent as well as 5-year incident hypertension in a Danish general population sample.

METHODS
Cross-sectional and prospective population-based study.

RESULTS
At baseline, among 5,307 participants (51.3% women, mean age 46.0±7.9 years) with a complete set of data, we recorded 1,979 cases with prevalent hypertension (PHT). Among 2,389 normotensive participants at baseline with a complete set of data, we recorded 324 cases with incident hypertension (IHT) on follow-up 5 years later. In models adjusted for age, sex, lifestyle, social, dietary, anthropometric, pulmonic, lipid, metabolic and renal risk factors, as well as heart rate and baseline blood pressure (only incident model), one standard deviation increase in baseline log-transformed NT-proBNP concentrations was on one side associated with a 21% higher risk of PHT (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-1.30], P<0.001), and on the other side with a 14% lower risk of IHT (OR: 0.86 [95%CI:0.76-0.98], P = 0.020).

CONCLUSIONS
Higher serum concentrations of NT-proBNP associate with PHT whereas lower concentrations associate with IHT. This suggests that a lower amount of circulating BNP, resulting in diminished vasodilation and natriuresis, could be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension in its early stages.