Monitoring energy intake: a hand-held personal digital assistant provides accuracy comparable to written records.

Journal of the American Dietetic Association

PubMedID: 19559143

McClung HL, Sigrist LD, Smith TJ, Karl JP, Rood JC, Young AJ, Bathalon GP. Monitoring energy intake: a hand-held personal digital assistant provides accuracy comparable to written records. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(7):1241-5.
New approaches to assess energy intake (EI) may have advantages over traditional written methods, but validity of these emerging methodologies must be demonstrated. This exploratory study compared EI obtained using a hand-held personal digital assistant (PDA) and traditional written records with total energy expenditure measured by doubly labeled water (TEE(DLW)). Twenty-six volunteers (aged 23+/-4 years, body mass index [calculated as kg/m(2)] 24+/-2) participated in a randomized (either PDA or written record group) and matched (for sex, age, and body mass index) study for 7 consecutive days between June 2005 and April 2006 to record EI. Group comparisons were made with t and Mann-Whitney U tests. Bland-Altman plots were used to compare limits of agreement between methods. Volunteers remained weight stable during the study period (0. 2+/-0. 8 kg; P>0. 05). Reported EI by written record and PDA were similar to TEE(DLW); 105% vs 92% of TEE(DLW), respectively (P>0. 05). There was a significant relationship between reported EI by PDA and TEE(DLW) (r=0. 60, P<0. 05), but not for written record (r=0. 45, P>0. 05). Limits of agreement indicated both written record and PDA had large variability (range 1,394 to -1,472 kcal/day). FINDINGS
suggest the bias in using a PDA is similar to that observed when using a written record for estimation of EI in weight-stable volunteers.Findings suggest the bias in using a PDA is similar to that observed when using a written record for estimation of EI in weight-stable volunteers.