Nutrition and inflammatory events: highly unsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 vs omega-6) in surgical injury.

Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

PubMedID: 1627206

Blackburn GL. Nutrition and inflammatory events: highly unsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 vs omega-6) in surgical injury. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1992;200(2):183-8.
Given the poor prognosis and high cost of care for patients with acute inflammatory responses (often leading to organ failure and/or allograft rejection), immunomodulation of this hyperresponse represents an important priority for research in nutritional medicine. The primary goal of nutritional support in inflammatory disease is to provide adequate energy, particularly through use of novel lipids (to alter eicosanoid pathway toward a more regulated inflammatory state), and protein to meet endogenous requirements for tissue repair IL-1 production, and restored cellular function, thus preventing secondary infection (52). Manipulation of macrophage eicosanoid production by use of omega-3 PUFA may reduce the cellular immune response (by competing with arachidonic acid, which produces inflammatory eicosanoids of the 2- and 4-series), whereas inclusion of MCT found in coconut oil may lower the arachidonic acid content of membrane phospholipids. As more data are obtained on the use of such tailored therapies in critically ill patients, a new generation of parenteral and enteral diets will be developed to reduce inflammation and immune dysfunction.