The priority of basic research on ageing vulnerability in a comprehensive research agenda on ageing for the 21st century.

Novartis Foundation symposium

PubMedID: 11280031

Andrews GR. The priority of basic research on ageing vulnerability in a comprehensive research agenda on ageing for the 21st century. Novartis Found Symp. 2001;2354-9; discussion 9-10.
The prospects for individual and population ageing as we enter a new century pose some of the greatest social, economic and humanitarian challenges humankind as a whole has ever faced. The basic biological mechanisms that control human ageing remain ill understood but it is clear that for many individuals exhibiting predisposition to risk factors for certain chronic diseases, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, certain cancers and Alzheimer's disease, such predisposition is mediated through genetic processes that operate at a most fundamental biomolecular level interacting with nongenetic attributes. The prospect of improved understanding of the fundamental processes underlying the pathogenesis of common age-related diseases that may lead to identification of interventions that are effective in preventing, delaying or ameliorating the diseases and their consequences is compelling. It is this prospect that provides the prime justification for giving high priority to research on ageing vulnerability in a comprehensive research agenda on ageing for the 21st century.