A systematic review of adherence to restricted diets in people with functional bowel disorders.

Appetite

PubMedID: 25979567

Osicka T, Kothe E, Ricciardelli L. A systematic review of adherence to restricted diets in people with functional bowel disorders. Appetite. 2015;.
Functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome are commonly experienced within the population, and have an adverse impact on emotions, physical well-being, social activity, and occupational output. Adherence to a restricted diet can reduce symptoms, which in turn leads to increased quality of life and well-being. THE AIM
of this review was to assess the extent to which predictors of dietary adherence have been considered in studies relating to functional bowel disorders and following a restricted diet.This was done firstly by examining such studies which contained a measure or indicator of adherence, and then by examining predictors of adherence within and between studies. A search of PsycINFO, Medline, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases was performed during July 2014, with the search criteria including relevant terms such as gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome, diet, and adherence. Of an initial 7927 papers, 39 were suitable for inclusion. Fourteen of the 39 studies included had a structured measure or indicator of dietary adherence, and the remaining 25 mentioned adherence without any structured levels of adherence. There was little investigation into the predictors of adherence, with symptom relief or induction being the primary goal of most of the studies. This review indicates that predictors of dietary adherence are rarely considered in research regarding functional bowel disorders. Further investigation is needed into the variables which contribute to rates of adherence to restricted diets, and more rigorous research is needed to characterise those individuals most likely to be non-adherent. Such research is necessary to ensure that people with these conditions can be provided with appropriate support and interventions.