Suburethral sling in autoimmune patients: complications, quality of life, and success rate.

International urogynecology journal

PubMedID: 22068324

Angioli R, Montera R, Plotti F, Terranova C, Aloisi A, Zullo MA. Suburethral sling in autoimmune patients: complications, quality of life, and success rate. Int Urogynecol J. 2012;23(4):453-7.
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS
Suburethral sling procedures are a mainstay for the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The interaction between the sling and the host is fundamental for the success of the procedure. Patients affected by autoimmune disease present with an overactive immune system; this should theoretically increase rejection risk.

METHODS
The data from 19 autoimmune patients affected by SUI were retrospectively collected. Primary outcome consisted of evaluating whether tape-related complications may occur more frequently. Secondary outcome measures were assessment of objective and subjective cure of SUI. Changes from baseline were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney and Fisher tests.

RESULTS
Success rate, evaluated at 12-month follow-up, was 89.5%. No tape erosion or urinary retention was observed; chronic pelvic pain and dyspareunia rates were 5.26% and 15.4%, respectively. One patient developed de novo urgency.

CONCLUSIONS
According to our experience, the suburethral sling is a safe procedure with low complication rates comparable to those reported in the literature.